DeadGuyQuotes's Blog

American History in the Making

Democratic Models

Dan Snowdall and I struggled with defining Democratic Relativism while simultaneously comparing the various models discussed in class over the last few weeks. We were completely flummoxed by the undefinable nature of the concepts we were discussing and have been challenged with giving the concepts some form. Coming from an undergraduate degree in Government as well as History and possessing general proclivities toward systems modeling I needed a picture. Today, we grappled with the various concepts and settled on the models and definitions as briefly listed below. We ask for comments AND CORRECTIONS if we are wildly off-base or confusing. We look forward to the discussion!

Jeffersonian Democracy:

Characteristics:

  • Rigid
  • Committed faith in a rational man
  • Strong bonds holding the political elements together resting on the foundation of the citizen
  • A priori truths that are self-evident (Divinity, Life, Liberty, Pursuit of Happiness, Equality)
  • Individual responsibilities
  • Isolationist
  • Non-elitist
  • Limited Government
  • Hierarchical, ordered

Hamiltonian Democracy:

Characteristics:

  • Rigid
  • Committed faith in rational collective (government)
  • Strong bonds holding the political elements together resting on the foundation of the government, but top-heavy
  • Collective responsibilities
  • Expansionist
  • Elitist
  • Aggressive expansion of federal identity (debt, taxes, regulations, foreign affairs, etc)
  • Hierarchical, ordered

Dewian Democracy:

Characteristics:

  • Fluid processes
  • Committed faith in the process
  • Reliance on rational man
  • Weak bonds holding the political elements together, risk of anarchy
  • Mutual responsibilities (collective and individual and process)
  • Non-Elitist
  • Non- hierarchical, potentially disordered

Jamesian Democracy:

Characteristics:

  • Fluid processes
  • Committed faith in the balance between government and citizen (high ethics of government and benevolence of man)
  • Reliance on rational man
  • Weak bonds holding the political elements together requiring high faith, risk of anarchy
  • Mutual responsibilities (collective and individual)
  • Elitist (specialists)
  • Hierarchical

Democratic Relativism:

Characteristics:

  • Extremely fluid processes
  • Dynamic
  • Acknowledgment of a non-rational man
  • Strong bonds holding the political elements together centering around the corpus of law giving form to a reasonably constant/rigid democratic processes
  • Quantitative discovery dynamically shifts weight with intangible political “beliefs” as strength of one over the other balance each other out in the “Reality of the Process”.


Democratic Relativism: (circa 1968)

Characteristics:

  • Extremely fluid processes
  • Extremely Dynamic
  • Rise of Government as an Actor (a(x)) distinct from Government as a Function (f(x))
  • Strong bonds holding the political elements together centering around the corpus of law giving form to a reasonably constant/rigid democratic processes
  • Two actors (Citizen and Government) interacting with Science and Faith
  • Faith in Government as a Function
  • Acceptance in Government as an Actor
  • Processes remain governed by rules
  • Gov (f(x)) informs the actors as a necessary element of Democracy
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March 6, 2010 Posted by | 20th Century American Democracy | , , , | 1 Comment